I want…but I don’t want…

I know that it’s been a really long time since I’ve last posted. I have to admit – I haven’t had much to say. But, over the last few months I’ve gotten some… Continue reading

Candomblé, Umbanda e Macumba…Oh My!

There seem to be many conflicting view points as to what these religions are, and that’s always bound to happen when a religion or tradition is oral rather than prescribed in a book.… Continue reading

Color in Candomblé

The other day I received a message on MySpace from a gentleman who wanted to know if I could refer him to any “all Black houses” of Candomblé in Brazil, preferably in Bahia.… Continue reading

Religious Persecution

A few months ago I went to a townhall meeting to discuss issues across the Orisa traditions in NYC. During the discussion someone asked why there weren’t more olorisa visible in public? Why… Continue reading

Candomblé Documentary in English

This is a great clip of a documentary that discusses some of the dancing and drumming of Candomblé.

Iyawo for 7 years…what?!?!?

by Iya Melissa  I’ve been meeting more and more people lately who have been asking about our period of Iyawo in Candomblé. More often than not people already have the mind frame of… Continue reading

The Importance of Language

I took my first trip to Brazil knowing how to say less than 10 phrases in Portuguese. I relied totally on the translations of a then-friend to help me get around. I’m fluent… Continue reading

Getting Involved in Candomblé

by Iya Melissa Because Candomblé is the youngest Orisha tradition in the Orisha Diaspora (Outside of Brasil, Cuba or Nigeria) it can be a little more difficult to find fully initiated priests in… Continue reading

Initiation Period in Candomblé

The initial Candomblé initiation period lasts at least 21 days for an elegun (person who gets possessed). The Iyawo spends at least 21 days in the Terreiro for the initiation(and usually more); traditional… Continue reading

Candomblé Priesthood

Within Candomblé, there are two categories of initiates; those who are eleguns (people who can possess Orisa) and those who are not. Eleguns are called Iyawo (bride of the Orisha), even when they… Continue reading

Olorisas and Health

My initiatory period was the most routine time of my life. I ate at the same times everyday, and knew what to expect of my meals more or less. Most days the menu… Continue reading

Godchild or Client?

Sometimes I wonder if people really understand what they are getting into when they enter Orisa religion in any of its branches (Nigerian, Brazilian, Cuban, T&T, etc…) There are so many stories out… Continue reading