Tag Archive: candomble usa

Women Combat Religious Intolerance

by Iya Melissa In 2014, Marcos Rezende premiered his documentary, “Mulheres de Axé,” (Women of Axé) during New York City’s Brazil Week.  I had the pleasure of attending the presentation of his work… Continue reading

But in Candomblé They Only do Head & Foot…

I’m not sure where the myth began that Candomblé initiations are done “head and foot,” but it’s a grave misconception.

Worshipping Orixá isn’t About Expecting Miracles

When we make ebo, it’s not a business transaction we’re making with Orixá; we need water, but water doesn’t need us.

A Refuge in Thunder: Dr. Harding Lectures About Candomblé

A Refuge in Thunder, by Dr. Rachel E. Harding, takes a close look at the trajectory of Candomblé in its Brazilian home as a religion of resilience and affirmation of a Black identity in Brazil.

Agudas: From Yorubaland to Brazil & Back

During slavery, Yoruba people were among the later ethnic groups to be captured. Yoruba-Brazilians, then, had clearer memories of their roots which allowed them to return home.

Praising Mothers

Orisa bi iya, ko si. Iya la ba ma bo. In other words, there is no Orisa like (or greater than) mother, it is mother who is worthy to be praised.

The Beauty of a Iyawo’s Initiation in Candomblé – A Translation

Oh, if you knew how beautiful it is to watch your gestation in the uterus (honko) of the ile, in your simplicity of white, seeing your initiation and being born into the religion.  Giving… Continue reading

When Depression Shows Up, How Do You?

It’s not unusual for someone to break down in tears during a reading.  Sometimes the desperation is palpable, and we should do our best to help in whatever ways we can. Divination reveals a lot about us, and it’s not uncommon to see when someone is suffering from depression.

Ecology and Candomblé

Part of our worship of nature involves making offerings, but all too often those offerings become pollution – an affront to the very nature we serve.  While we absolutely have religious freedom and can practice our beliefs without fear, we also have the responsibility of keeping the environment clean.

Homosexuality in Candomblé

Every single person is deserving of respect and feeling like their Ori is being honored. We all have that piece of the divine within us, working through us and exchanging axé all the time. That respect extends to all differences we may have, including differences in sexuality.

English Interview: Iya Omindarewa

Iya Omindarewa’s story is interesting, being a non-Brazilian priestess who ran a terreiro in Rio for many years.  This short documentary doesn’t tell her entire story, but takes the viewer on a short… Continue reading

Witchcraft?

Besides seeking a reading to figure out matters of love or money, one of the most common reasons that people consult merindinlogun is because they believe that someone is using witchcraft to work… Continue reading

Orisha Workshop: Chicago